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Latest update: 10 December 2019

Previously in ClimateChangePost

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A high occurrence of positive temperature anomalies in the lead-up of slope failures in the Italian Alps supports the hypothesis that climate warming is destabilizing slopes at high-elevation sites.

When the Mediterranean Sea warms up, hurricanes in the area are likely to become more vigorous. Their winds will be stronger, and they will lead to more intense precipitation, increasing flood risk.

More needs to be done to protect the lagoon and the city in addition to the MOSE barrier, experts state. One option: raising the city by injecting fluid cement or water in the city’s subsoil.

An assessment shows that most World Heritage sites in low-lying coastal areas of the Mediterranean are at risk from coastal flooding or erosion, already today. Sea-level rise will make things worse.

Burned area over Mediterranean Europe may increase by 40-54% under 1.5°C global warming. Higher levels of global warming increase drought conditions that in turn lead to larger burned areas.

Sea level rise reconstructed step by step. Submerged steps of water stairs of palaces on the Grand Canal provide an exceptionally long series of data on sea level rise.

Presented by Filomena Pietrapertosa of the National Research Council of Italy at the European Climate Change Adaptation Conference in Glasgow in June 2017.

Climate change may reduce potential rice yields in the Mediterranean. Adaptation strategies could overturn the situation, however, turning climate change into an opportunity for European rice growers.

Anthropogenic climate change will likely alter ecosystems in the Mediterranean this century in a way that is without precedent during the past 10,000 years.

Annual number of landslides in central Italy will increase by 30% and 45% for 2040-2069 and 2070-2099, respectively. This is due to an increase of rainfall intensity in the hours prior to landslides.

In contrast to global climate model projections the intensity of summer rainfall may increase. This is important for fresh water supply and, for instance, with respect to flash floods.

For the Alps, the main trigger of debris flows is high intensity, short duration rainfall. Under future climate change, it is likely that increases in extreme rainfall will alter debris flow frequency

The global area of dryland is increasing rapidly. This was shown from data over the period 1948–2005, and seems to proceed towards the end of this century.

In Italy, landslides are a serious threat to the population: in the period 1954–2013 1279 persons were killed and 1731 were injured by landslides. Rainfall is the primary trigger

Global warming affects precipitation volumes in the Alps, the contribution of rain and snow to these volumes, and the timing of snowmelt. An overall decrease in snow cover

There is growing evidence that the rate of warming is amplified with elevation, such that high-mountain environments experience more rapid changes in temperature

Climate-change driven increase in rainfall erosivity could have strong adverse effects for the Mediterranean, such as an exacerbated soil degradation

According to a recent study, the chance of extremely hot summers would have increased dramatically since the 2003 European heat wave.

European wine farms show considerable potential to improve their economic performance, and thereby ease their situation in a global change scenario.

The northern Adriatic Sea has been influenced by significant warming of air temperature, changes in precipitation pattern, and a varying Po river runoff

The Mediterranean Sea is warming in both shallow and deep waters. This warming is part of global climate trends and not a regional phenomenon.

In the Alps, the overall frequency of debris flows may decrease in absolute terms, but the magnitude of events may increase.

Strong reduction of snow cover in the Alps is expected to have major impacts on winter tourism. Many ski-regions have mean elevations below 2,000 m

Model results present no statistical evidence of changes of storm surge statistics in the future climate scenario. This shows that likely the main hazard to Venice is posed by future sea level rise.

One of the areas most negatively affected by climate change is the Po-valley in Northern Italy, which is both heavily urbanized and also one of the largest industrialized regions in Europe.

So far, forest fires do not constitute a significant hazard in the central and northern parts of the Alps, while on the southern side they are more common

Substantial reductions in potential groundwater recharge are projected for the 21st century in southern Europe and increases in northern Europe ...

The extremes of possible climate-change-driven habitat range size reductions are commonly based on two assumptions ...

Will tidal flooding events in Venice increase in frequency and intensity during the 21st century? This has been debated recently ...

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