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Latest update: 18 June 2019 On our homepage, summarized in infographics: Europe's climate change impacts on agriculture, biodiversity, coastal floods, health, forest fires .... it's all there!

Previously in ClimateChangePost

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The latest high-resolution climate model projections confirm earlier projections for mainland Portugal: hot days will get much hotter, and heat waves more frequent and extreme.

Burned area over Mediterranean Europe may increase by 40-54% under 1.5°C global warming. Higher levels of global warming increase drought conditions that in turn lead to larger burned areas.

Europe’s summer season starts earlier, by 4 days per decade. As a result, mega heat waves may occur unusually early in the year when compared to the historical record. This was the case in 2017.

Portugal’s forest area has increased since 1875 from 7% to nearly 40% of the country’s mainland area. This trend has reversed since 1990, however, likely due to wildfires and their mismanagement.

In Spain and Portugal the number of heat waves, their duration and intensity will increase in the course of this century. At the same time, less cold spells will occur, and they will become less cold.

Presented by Francisca Aguiar of the University of Lisbon at the European Climate Change Adaptation Conference in Glasgow in June 2017.

June 18 2017. Large forest fires strike Portugal, northeast of Lisbon. Many people have been killed. This article has been published before on the ClimateChangePost.

Shifts in thermal growing conditions may represent a major challenge to the Portuguese fruit sector. Conditions will improve in some areas and deteriorate in others.

Climate change is expected to change the optimal zones for grape varieties. Grapes are expected to ripen earlier in warmer climates, but unbalanced ripening may lead to lower wine quality.

The global area of dryland is increasing rapidly. This was shown from data over the period 1948–2005, and seems to proceed towards the end of this century.

If current management of oak forests is maintained, climate change may result in 20% decrease in cork production in 2100. Adapted management strategies include reducing debarking intensity

Precipitation in Portugal is projected to decrease throughout this century, and more clustered into extreme events, accentuating the vulnerability

European wine farms show considerable potential to improve their economic performance, and thereby ease their situation in a global change scenario.

In Portugal, during 1865-2010 1,621 disastrous floods and 281 disastrous landslides were recorded that led to casualties or injuries, and

For the period 1927–2011, Portuguese data on landings of species with affinity for temperate waters generally presented a decreasing trend, whereas

Since 1980 an area equivalent to 3/5 of the forested surface in Portugal has burned. The burnt areas in July and August account for 71% of the total burnt area in Portugal.

Severe hurricane-force (> 32.6 m/s) storms can cause floods in west-European coastal regions and inflict large-scale damage on infrastructure and agriculture.

The combined effect of changes in recharge, crop water demand and sea level rise on groundwater levels and flow into coastal wetlands was studied for three Mediterranean areas ...

Natural disasters by landslides and floods are frequent events on Madeira Island ...

Wine production is projected to increase by about 10% by the end of the 21st century, while the occurrence of high production years is expected to increase from 25% to over 60% ...

Wine production along the Douro Valley is projected to increase for 2071–2100 compared with 1961–1990 because of the combined effects of temperature and precipitation ...

A commercial opportunity for fisheries may arise from climate warming, since most of the new species were commercial species ...

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