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In contrast to global climate model projections the intensity of summer rainfall may increase. This is important for fresh water supply and, for instance, with respect to flash floods.

For the Alps, the main trigger of debris flows is high intensity, short duration rainfall. Under future climate change, it is likely that increases in extreme rainfall will alter debris flow frequency

Global warming affects precipitation volumes in the Alps, the contribution of rain and snow to these volumes, and the timing of snowmelt. An overall decrease in snow cover

Climate change is considered a large threat to especially montane species. These species often inhabit narrow elevational ranges

There is growing evidence that the rate of warming is amplified with elevation, such that high-mountain environments experience more rapid changes in temperature

Estimation of the impact of climate change on the growth cycle of the grapevine has shown a significant impact on harvest timing and season duration.

The Mediterranean Sea is warming in both shallow and deep waters. This warming is part of global climate trends and not a regional phenomenon.

In the Alps, the overall frequency of debris flows may decrease in absolute terms, but the magnitude of events may increase.

Strong reduction of snow cover in the Alps is expected to have major impacts on winter tourism. Many ski-regions have mean elevations below 2,000 m

So far, forest fires do not constitute a significant hazard in the central and northern parts of the Alps, while on the southern side they are more common

During the period 1951–2007, mean annual temperatures in Slovenia have increased significantly by 0.15 to 0.29°C/decade ...

Discharge is projected to increases during winter and decrease during summer months. The duration of low-flow situations becomes longer ...

The extremes of possible climate-change-driven habitat range size reductions are commonly based on two assumptions ...

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I recommend

National plans/strategies for Slovenia

  • Slovenia’s Sixth National Communication under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) (2014). Download.

Reports/papers that focus on important Slovenian topics

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Reports/papers that present a sound overview for Europe

  • Eisenreich (2005). Climate change and the European water dimension. A report to the European water directors.
  • European Environment Agency (2005). Vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in Europe. Download.
  • European Environment Agency, JRC and WHO (2008). Impact of Europe’s changing climate – 2008 indicator-based assessment. Download.

Reports/papers that focus on specific topics, relevant for all of Europe

  • Agriculture: Rounsevell et al. (2005). Future scenarios of European agricultural land use II. Projecting changes in cropland and grassland. Download.
  • Agriculture: Fischer et al. (2005). Socio-economic and climate change impacts on agriculture: an integrated assessment, 1990–2080. Download.
  • Biodiversity: Thuiller et al. (2005). Climate change threats to plant diversity in Europe. Download.
  • Coastal erosion: Salman et al. (2004). Living with coastal erosion in Europe: sediment and space for sustainability. Download.
  • Droughts: Blenkinsop and Fowler (2007). Changes in European drought characteristics projected by the PRUDENCE regional climate models. Download.
  • Droughts: European Environment Agency (2009). Water resources across Europe – confronting water scarcity and drought. Download.
  • Forestry: Seppälä et al. (2009). Adaptation of forests and people to climate change. A global assessment report. Download.
  • Health: Kosatsky (2005). The 2003 European heat waves. Download.
  • Health: WHO (2008). Protecting health in Europe from climate change. Download.
  • Insurance and Business: Mills et al. (2005). Availability and affordability of insurance under climate change. A growing challenge for the U.S. Download.
  • Security and Crisis management: German Advisory Council on Global Change (2007). World in transition: Climate change as a security risk. Summary for policy-makers. Download.
  • Storms: Gardiner et al. (2010). Destructive storms in European forests: Past and forthcoming impacts. Download.
  • Storms: Pinto et al. (2007). Changing European storm loss potentials under modified climate conditions according to ensemble simulations of the ECHAM5/MPI-OM1 GCM. Download.
  • Tourism: Deutsche Bank Research (2008). Climate change and tourism: Where will the journey lead? Download.

Weblogs in English and Slovene

Weblogs in Slovene

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EU funded Research Projects

Aquifers

Avalanches and landslides

Climate change scenarios

Coastal areas

Cultural-historical heritage

Droughts and water scarcity

Flash Floods

Floods

Fresh water resources

Mitigation / adaptation options and costs

Tourism

Urban areas

Coastal erosion Slovenia

Vulnerabilities

The coastline of Slovenia is 46 km long. Flysch rock (alternating marls, siltstones and sandstones) stretches along the entire Slovenian coast and along parts of the coast of Croatia and Montenegro. Badlands are a common erosional landscape on the flysch, and cliffed coasts evolve under destructive wave impact and subaerial weathering and erosional processes. The majority of the cliffs are up to 80 m in height. At some locations there are gravel/pebble beaches (1). Cliff erosion rate is 1-2 cm/year (2).

Adaptation strategies

Some 82% of the Slovenian coastline is manmade. Some urbanized coastal areas have historical protection ranging from seawalls and submerged breakwaters to rock dikes. These structures have been effective for centuries and the erosion of the Slovenian coastline is generally well controlled and properly managed (3).

References

The references below are cited in full in a separate map 'References'. Please click here if you are looking for the full references for Slovenia.

  1. Pikelj et al. (2013)
  2. Sunamaru (2005), in: Pikelj et al. (2013)
  3. Vahtar (2002), in: Pikelj et al. (2013)
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